NFC Tags

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rfid maker

Professional NFC Tags manufacturer

Custom bulk of different types of NFC tags from China supplier, you have a variety of choice at cheap wholesale price. Reduce your cost and increase efficiency, enjoy benefit business.
RFID tag Maker provide NFC tags, NFC stickers, NFC card, NFC inlays, or NFC discs tag. As well as other NFC products such as NFC wristbands, NFC keychains, NFC business cards, NFC laundry tags, and even NFC drink mats, you can buy all best NFC tag products as below at best wholesale price.

 

Custom by NFC Tag Feature

Buy NFC tag sticker

RFID Tag Maker is a Chinese NFC tag sticker  factory. NFC (Near Field Communication) tag sticker  is a small, adhesive label that contains an NFC chip and antenna. It is a passive device that can be read and programmed using an NFC-enabled device such as a smartphone or a dedicated NFC reader. NFC tag sticker are commonly used for a variety of applications, such as asset tracking, product authentication, and contactless payments. They are easy to attach to a wide range of surfaces and materials, and can be programmed to store and transmit information such as serial numbers, product information, or payment data. Overall, NFC sticker tags offer a simple and cost-effective way to add NFC functionality to a wide range of products and applications.See below more NFC tag sticker and contact us for free samples and quotation.

Our collection of NFC tag sticker covers an extensive spectrum to cater to every need. We exclusively employ official and original Integrated Circuits, popularly known as chips, sourced from NXP (Mifare, NTAG213, NTAG215, NTAG216).

RFID tag Maker take pride in offering not only stock NFC tag Stickers but also bespoke printed options to meet specific requirements. With over a decade of experience, we are well-equipped to fulfill large volume orders, ensuring quality, shape, type, and branding are impeccably maintained. Don’t hesitate to reach out for any bespoke or volume-related inquiries; we’re here to help.

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Custom social NFC tag

Custom social NFC tag

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custom nfc tag bracelet

Custom NFC tag bracelet

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Custom NFC jewelry tag

Custom NFC jewelry tag

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Custom NFC disc tag

Custom NFC disc tag

Custom Anti-metal NFC tag

Custom anti-metal NFC tag from profesional Chinese manufacturer. The anti-metal NFC tag, also known as an on-metal NFC tag or metal-mount NFC tag, is a type of NFC (Near Field Communication) tag that can be used on metal surfaces. Standard NFC tags cannot be read accurately when placed directly on metal because the metal surface can interfere with the signal.

Anti-metal NFC tags, however, are designed to work effectively on metal surfaces by using a special material or design that helps to reduce interference from the metal. This allows the tags to be used for a variety of applications, such as asset tracking on metal surfaces, inventory management, and anti-counterfeiting measures.

 

Custom NFC wristband

China factory, RFID Tag Maker’s NFC wristbands are available in a range of shapes, sizes, and materials, such as silicone, plastic, and fabric. RFID Tag maker is a professional NFC wristband manufacturer.They can be customized with branding or logos, and some are even waterproof, making them suitable for use in swimming pools, water parks, and other wet environments.

NFC wristbands is types of NFC (Near Field Communication) tags that can be used for a variety of applications.

NFC wristbands are commonly used for access control, cashless payments, and event ticketing. For example, at music festivals, attendees may be given an NFC wristband that serves as their ticket and allows them to purchase food, drinks, and merchandise without the need for cash or cards. NFC wristbands can also be used for tracking attendance and managing crowds at events.

NFC wristbands can be read and programmed using an NFC-enabled device, such as a smartphone or a dedicated NFC reader. The wristbands typically operate at a frequency of 13.56 MHz and have a read range of up to a few centimeters.

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NFC Wristband

NFC Wristband

Customized NFC Keyfob

RFID Tag Maker your one-stop NFC supplier for diversity of NFC keyfobs, save your time and money. We can make suggestions if you detailed discribe the application of NFC key fob.
NFC keyfob is a small, keychain-sized device that contains an NFC chip and an antenna. It is commonly used for access control, cashless payments, and loyalty programs, and can be read and programmed using an NFC-enabled device such as a smartphone or a dedicated NFC reader.
NFC keyfobs are designed for convenience and security. They are easy to carry around and can be attached to a keychain or lanyard, making them easily accessible when needed. They are also highly secure, as they can be programmed to grant access only to authorized individuals, and can be deactivated if lost or stolen.

In addition to access control and cashless payments, NFC keyfobs can also be used for a range of other applications, such as loyalty programs, employee identification, and asset tracking. They are available in a variety of shapes, sizes, and materials, making them suitable for a wide range of environments and use cases.

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RFID keyfob Mifare classic 4k blue

RFID keyfob Mifare classic 4k blue

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RFID Keyfob MIFARE Plus EV1 4K Red

RFID Keyfob MIFARE Plus EV1 4K Red

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Real Leather RFID Keyfob Manufacturer

Real Leather RFID Keyfob Manufacturer

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RFID Faux Leather Keychain Manufacturer

RFID Faux Leather Keychain Manufacturer

Buy by NFC Tag Forum

 RFID Tag Maker is a professional Chines manufacturer of nfc tags, we not only provide preferential wholesale prices, but also help you choose and buy the correct nfc tag according to your application.
RFID Tag Maker produced the Type 2 NFC tag.The NFC Forum Tag Type 2 is compliant with ISO14443A. The NFC Forum Tag Type 2 NFC tag is the most cost-effective option because it provides sufficient functionality at an appropriate price to meet market demands. The NFC Forum Tag Type 2 NFC tag is read-and-write capable and can be configured to be read-only by the user. The NXP® Ntag and MIFARE® ULTRALIGHT series are typical NFC Tag Type 2 ICs. Typical applications for NFC Forum Tag Type 2 NFC tag include low-value transactions and RFID event tickets. Please kindly see RFID Tag Maker produced NFC Forum Tag Type 2 NFC tags, contact us to get price list.

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Custom Sapele Wood Business Cards

Custom Sapele Wood Business Cards

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Beech Wood Business Cards

Beech Wood Business Cards

If you want to buy Type 4 NFC tag from China NFC tag factory, then you should contact us, RFID Tag Maker is a NFC tag factory over 15 years, they have rich production experience and the best wholesale price of NFC tags.

The NFC forum Type 4 NFC tag is compatible with ISO14443A and B standards and supports ISO/IEC 7816 security. These NFC ICs are pre-configured during manufacturing and can be either read/written or read-only; NDEF content can also be modified by the user. Typical NFCTag Type 4 ICs are the NXP® Desfire series, and typical NFC Tag Type 4 applications include payment and security.

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NXP NTAG® 424 DNA NFC label

NXP NTAG® 424 DNA NFC label

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NTAG424 Tamper Tags

NTAG424 Tamper Tags

Although Type 5 was released in 2015, RFID tag Maker has already been producing this kind of NFC tags, we keep up with market demand, improve technology, and produce various trendy nfc tags.
NFC Forum Tag Type 5 NFC tag is based on the RFID technology defined by the ISO/IEC 15693 specification. Originally, the ISO/IEC 15693 standard was created to enable a greater RF operational range than 1.5 meters. NFC Forum decided to support an Active Communication mode that permits data transfer performance comparable to the RFID technologies supported by NFC Forum, but restricts the reading distance at NFC devices. Typical Tag Type 5 ICs include the NXP® ICode series and STMicroelectronics’ ST25TV series. Typical Tag Type 5 applications include library books, packaging, tickets, etc. If you need want to order Type 5 NFC tag, please email us to get free sample and quotation.

Table of Contents

NFC tag chips

The NFC tag consists of three elements: the microchip that stores the data and handles the communication, the “NFC chip”, the antenna that collects the signals and exchanges the data, and then a substrate that brings all the elements together.
Here, we’re talking about the NFC microchip itself. You can see the little black dots on the NFC tag. There are significant differences in scan distance performance between different NFC chips or chip families. The age of the original NFC chip design can play a role, but the biggest factor is usually the level of technology within the chip.
More complex technologies such as encryption may require an increase in the amount of energy needed to power the chip. Since NFC tags get all their energy from the proximity of the cell phone (or other NFC reading device), the increased energy requirements usually mean the phone needs to be closer. As a result, simpler NFC tags tend to be more energy efficient.
For example, the MIFARE Ultralight C® chip, which includes advanced encryption technology, scans less than a third of the distance of a simpler chip such as the NTAG213.
So, the rule here is simple. If you don’t need advanced technology, don’t use these chips.
At the heart of every NFC tag, NFC sticker or NFC product is an NFC “chip” or “IC” (integrated circuit). These tiny electronic devices store your information and control how it is accessed.
Different NFC chips have different amounts of memory and functionality. The amount of memory will determine how much data you can store on the chip. Other features include password protection, scan counter, or tamper detection.
Here are the different chips included in the NFC tag and the amount of memory

 

Popular NFC Chips

NXP’s NTAG family of chips are by far the most common chips used in mobile applications. Basic details are listed here, and a breakdown of each feature and chip is listed below.

 

ChipMemoryUser MemoryMax URLScan CounterPasswordAuth
MIFARE Ultralight644840
MIFARE Ultralight EV1 (80byte)804840Yes
MIFARE Ultralight EV1 (164byte)164128120Yes
NTAG203(discontinued)168144136*
NTAG210µ644840
NTAG210804840Yes
NTAG213180144136*YesYes
NTAG215540504492YesYes
NTAG216924888854YesYes
NTAG424256**240YesYesYes
NTAG213 TTtbctbctbcYesYes
ST25TN01K256160152
ST25TN5122566456
NTAG426Q916**YesYesYes
NTAG223144**YesYesYes
NTAG224207**YesYesYes

 

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Other NFC chips

Obviously, ST, NTAG, ICODE and MIFARE Ultralight® chips are not the only NFC chips on the market. Of course, NXP and ST Microelectronics are not the only manufacturers, as companies such as EM Microelectronic also produce NFC chips.
RFID TAG MAKER tends to focus on the NTAG family for the simple reason that they are the most widely used and universally compatible. Some other chips (such as MIFARE Classic®) are not compatible with the NFC Forum. Most others are only available as very large professional orders.
MIFARE, MIFARE Ultralight, MIFARE Classic and MIFARE DESFire are registered trademarks of NXP B.V.
This is a typical problem. NFC tags are integrated into products or behind a piece of advertising material and now the tags cannot be scanned. The reason is simple. The tag scanning distance is not good enough. So how do you maximize the scanning distance?

 

Memory and User Memory

Memory and user memory are listed here in bytes. Memory is the total amount of memory within the chip. It is important to note that this is very, very small compared to other storage devices such as USB sticks. In fact, most NFC tags can only store roughly one sentence of text.
However, there are some parts of that storage space that are reserved for the tag’s functionality. For example, data modification permission information, the chip’s UID (genuine chips cannot be changed) and so on. This means that the user who wishes to store data on the tag cannot use all the available storage space, but only the space minus this important data – the “user storage”.
NTAG424 is a complex authentication tag with multiple storage sectors. Depending on the memory area used, the total possible memory storage is higher than this value. However, for NDEF message storage, the available space is 256 bytes.

 

Maximum URL

To make it easier to understand what is actually stored in this user memory space, this table shows the maximum length of the URL (web address) that can be stored on the tag. This is the number of characters in your URL that do not contain “https://” or “https://www”. section. Use our NFC tag memory calculator to find out which chips you can use.
*For NTAG213, we use the available memory by excluding the locking control TLV codes for dynamic locking bytes. These will take up an additional 5 bytes, but can be used to increase the possible length of the URL if dynamic locking is not required (which is extremely rare).

 

NFC tag size

Let’s be clear. It’s not the NFC tag size that affects the scan distance, it’s the NFC antenna size. The antenna is the coil inside the NFC tag that generates energy and powers the chip. Theoretically, the larger the NFC antenna, the more energy it can collect and the longer the read range. RFID TAG MAKER manufactures different sizes of NFC TAG antennae for different applications.

 

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NFC tag design

NFC tag design is a very complex area. Putting aside the NFC frequency regulation, here we talk about NFC tag antenna design.
Therefore, a single strand of wire in a simple loop will be “smaller” than a single strand wound three times. In other words, it is not entirely related to the range of the antenna, but to the length.
Most NFC tags are etched. This means that it is a single wire in a spiral loop. Obviously, there is a limit to the length of the wire in a 25 mm diameter space. However, the length of the coil is affected by the chip position and the thickness of the “wire” (and the gap between the wires). It can make a significant difference to the actual length.
In addition, especially for tags, there is a margin. That is the gap between the outermost edge of the coil and the edge of the label. So your label may be 29 mm, but your coil diameter may only be 25 mm. This is the NFC tag manufacturer’s ability to get the coil in the right place. A cheaper manufacturer will have a poorer tolerance and, as compensation, will use a smaller antenna. What you get is a poor performing NFC tag of that size.
Read through our information on NFC tag sizes for a comparison of scanning performance for typical standard sizes.
The rule here is to buy good-quality NFC tags and consider the size of the antenna rather than the size of the tag.

 

nfc tag instruction

NFC tag reading distance

In short, if you use your phone to scan an NFC tag, it is usually between 1 cm and 5 cm. Many factors can affect performance. The larger the NFC TAG antenna, the further the reading distance will be.
The effectiveness of scanning an NFC TAG directly affects the user experience, and if the NFC tag does not respond easily, the user will quickly give up trying. Unfortunately, users give up on slow responding NFC tags much faster than you might think.
The rule here is that you want to buy an antenna that is as large as possible to fit your project. 29 mm to 38 mm tag sizes scan well, read far and respond quickly. However, if you can accommodate the credit card size, then it may perform better. Any size larger than that may result in degraded performance for many phones. Labels smaller than 25 mm require careful consideration and should not be used for marketing unless you have no choice and no space.
So, what is the actual scan distance you expect in the real world. This depends on the phone, the tag and the bit. To complicate things further, it can also depend on the tag/handset combination, where one antenna design is better suited to a particular handset than another.
This means there are no hard and fast answers. However, as a general rule, a 40 mm tag with an NTAG213 chip (with a 35 mm antenna) should be able to pair with a quality Android phone up to 5-6 cm without much problem. A tiny NTAG213 tag (e.g. 12mm x 19mm) might reach about 2cm.

 

 

 

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NFC tag scan counter

Some NFC tags can automatically store the number of times they have been scanned. This is called a scan counter. Within the NFC chip, a small amount of memory is reserved to record the scans and is automatically incremented each time a scan is made. This memory space can be read independently or, in some cases, automatically “mirrored” into the tag data string.
Note that this is not a good approach if you are using tags to count visits to, for example, a page. The user may scan the tag, increasing the count, but not access the URL stored on the tag. For example, the user may not be able to access the Internet or may cancel the integrated view before the page has a chance to load. In this case, the scan count will increase faster than the actual number of page views, resulting in incorrect data. Scan counters are often more useful for certain security or monitoring applications than for marketing.

 

NFC tag passwords

Some NFC tags have a password feature that allows controlled access to view or change the data on the tag. From the phone, an application is required for this. This is a fairly low level of security, but will prevent casual viewers from changing the data.

NFC tag authentication

The NTAG424, NTAG426, NTAG223 and NTAG224 NFC chips include a special feature that allows the data portion to be encrypted and securely attached to the tag’s URL. This then allows the tag to be used for NFC tag authentication where the tag cannot be easily copied.
This is a very advanced feature that requires a great deal of knowledge to encode the tag and authenticate the tag. However, NTAG413 and NTAG424 are among the latest generation of authentication tags and we expect to see more variants soon.

Common features of NFC tags

All NTAG family and MIFARE Ultralight® chips share a common set of features such as a seven-byte (14-character) unique ID (UID), universal compatibility with all current cell phones, tag locking capability, and NFC forum compatibility.

 

4. How do NFC tags work?

NFC works similar to RFID, except that NFC has a closer reading range, while RFID can be used over long distances, and NFC readers have a maximum operating range of about 4 inches (10 cm).
NFC works similarly to RFID (radio frequency identification) and Bluetooth. Unlike RFID, NFC tags work in close proximity, providing users with greater accuracy. nfc also does not require manual discovery and synchronization of devices like low-power Bluetooth. the biggest difference between RFID and NFC is the method of communication.
RFID tags have only one method of one-way communication, which means that RFID-enabled items send signals to the RFID reader.
NFC devices have both one-way and two-way communication capabilities, which gives NFC technology the upper hand in use cases where transactions rely on data from two devices (e.g., card payments). mobile wallets such as Apple Pay, Samsung Pay, Android Pay and other contactless payment solutions are powered by NFC technology.

 

 

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4.1 How do NFC authentication tags work?

In short, they prevent cloning by generating a new unique code each time an NFC tag is scanned, which can be verified by a third-party server.
While a standard NFC tag can be used to identify a product or item, there is (usually) nothing to prevent it from being copied into hundreds of counterfeit products. Authentication tags cannot be copied, so the level of protection against counterfeiting is greatly increased for each product.

4.2 Old and New Authentication Tags2

The use of authentication in NFC tags is nothing new. It has been used for years for ticketing and access control. So what’s the difference? The differences are in how the data is presented and how it is used.
For simplicity’s sake, in older chips, the authentication content is embedded deep into the chip. You need special NFC commands to access and control authentication. With some chips, you could theoretically do this with an app on an Android phone, but it’s complicated and not easy to implement.
Some of the newer generation NFC tags also have systems to check the authenticity of the chip manufacturer, which is linked to the UID of the chip. However, this is a “static” signature, and while it is harder to clone, it is not widely accepted as a “good solution”.
The new generation of NFC chips has two benefits.
First, NFC TAGs generate a unique code at each scan, which means that any data copied is incorrect at the next scan.
Second, they can display data within the URL NDEF area of the NFC tag. In short, this means you can use authentication technology by simply scanning the tag with a regular NFC-enabled phone that doesn’t require any apps. It’s called “frictionless” – all you need is a click.

4.3 NFC Authentication Process Explained

There are several variations of the NFC tag authentication process, but the principles are similar. Each NFC tag is encoded with a special key that is invisible. This key is used to generate a unique code at each scan, which can be added to the standard NDEF data. This means, for example, that the unique code can be automatically added to the URL encoded on the tag at each scan.
This unique code can then be checked on a remote server using a copy of the same key. The result is that the authenticity of the tag can be confirmed.
If the unique code is not what is expected, the tag can be assumed to be a copy. Each code can only be used once. Once the code is verified on the server, it is no longer valid.
To explain in very simple terms how the key system works, let’s consider a simple four-digit key – 8774. This key is saved and hidden on the tag and on the server. On the server, we also associate this key with a specific tag – in this case, the tag “123”.
When an NFC tag is scanned, the NFC chip inside the NFC tag performs an encryption calculation based on two elements: the number of scans (how many times the tag has been scanned) and the key.
So in the example above, the tag will use the key (8774) and the scan count (3) to generate a unique code using an encryption algorithm. In our example, we generated the code a43f3.
This code (a43f3) is then dynamically added to the web link encoded on the tag along with the scan count (3) and the tag’s ID number (123).
Each time the tag is scanned, the unique code is dynamically added to the URL encoded on the tag. To do this, when the tag is encoded, we leave a “space” on the URL so that the chip dynamically fills that space with the unique code.
The web link is now used to load a web page on the phone. The web page will come from a remote web server. The delete server then reads the unique code, scan count and tag ID by taking the parameters (data) passed to it in the URL.
The server then either checks the code itself or (behind the scenes) asks another authentication server if the code is valid.
The authentication server uses the count and the same hidden key (8774) to also generate the unique code (a43f3). When it does this, it can check that the code provided by the tag is indeed the same as expected. The authentication server usually uses the tag ID also provided to use the correct hidden key, since in most cases each tag has its own key.
Now, depending on whether the code matches, the web page can dynamically return the appropriate content to the user.
The point here is that the phone does not store or request the key during this process. They are not visible to the person scanning the NFC tag at any stage.
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4.4 Using NFC authentication tags in apps

In the example above, we show how to use authentication tags without any application installed on the phone. The tag scan will launch the web page from a remote server.
The same authentication tag will work in the App environment as well. The key is still stored in the same way on the tag and on the remote authentication server, but the intermediate app handles the authentication checks.
Depending on the phone/settings, the user will either open the app and scan the tag or just scan the tag to launch the app (steps 1 and 2).
After opening the application and scanning the tag, the application can perform checks against the third-party server in the background by passing the tag ID, count, and code scanned from the tag to the authentication server (step 3).
The auth server then verifies the response (step 4) and the app can confirm whether the item is genuine or fake (step 5).
Again, as with the web-based frictionless version, the security key is not stored in the app itself and is never seen or transmitted in the process.
Web scenarios and App scenarios are likely to use the same tags. In this case, the tags can be scanned without the application and they will launch a web page. If the app is opened before the tag is scanned, the same data can be accessed and then managed through the app.
For reasons we will cover later, using applications provides a higher level of security. However, allowing clients to perform both operations at the same time is a flexible and powerful option.

4.5 Token authentication keys

The actual size and definition of the key depends on the NFC chip manufacturer. Typically, however, the key is a random sequence of 16 characters.
Ideally, each individual NFC tag will be encoded using its own unique key. The server then stores which key is associated with each NFC tag ID. During the encoding process of putting data into the tag, the tag ID is also stored so that it is visible during the NFC tag scan.
The authentication server then requires three pieces of information – the NFC tag ID, the scan count, and the unique code.
The management of these keys is important because if the keys are not secure, then the security of the NFC tag is compromised. Access to the keys allows the creation of copies of the tags themselves, which can create counterfeit products.
At this point it is worth mentioning that the process of encoding an NFC authentication tag is much more complex than encoding a regular tag. Needless to say, any incorrect encoding will render the use of the authentication tag worthless.

5 How secure are NFC authentication tags?

The simple answer is that they are as secure as the small keypads often used to access bank accounts. The real risk is far from the NFC tag itself, but rather a flaw in the way NFC tags are used or encoded.
Can encryption and keys be cracked? It’s possible, but it’s not actually easy, and ultimately, in most use cases, it’s strong enough.
So where are the flaws? The first is inherent in “frictionless” NFC tag scanning. Essentially, the principle is that NFC tags can be scanned by any NFC-enabled phone without an application. The NFC tag will go directly to the website when it is scanned. The only code generated is automatically embedded in the URL that the phone uses to collect web pages, and the server checks the code in the background to determine if the tag is genuine. The downside is that most users don’t know what pages they’re about to see.
For example, a luxury brand might place an authenticated NFC tag in a handbag. The user scans the NFC tag and is redirected to the luxury brand’s website, which states whether it is authentic or not. However, the user does not know what the page looks like because they have never seen it before. So the company making the fake handbag can simply add any NFC tag that redirects to any web page anywhere, indicating that it is not fake. The user doesn’t really know the difference.
Now, this only becomes a problem for the average user who doesn’t know which page they want to see. In a closed-loop system such as a supply chain, the person doing the scanning may know what to expect and be prepared for what seems odd.
The solution is to use authentication tags in the App. The user downloads the app before scanning the tag, so the system is more secure. The app can control the connection to the authentication server and check for any error messages on the tag.
Is this a problem? Probably not. In many consumer-driven cases, the whole purpose of authentication labels in luxury goods, for example, has more to do with consumer interaction than any real control over counterfeit products. In this case, the act of verifying the goods gives a reason to download the application and the goal is achieved.
In other cases, such as the individual tagging of documents or other such items, it is more about being able to quickly and easily combine identification with a simple frictionless security element.
For many years, RFID TAG MAKER has been testing and using almost every authentication tag on the market. As a result, we are well aware of the powerful capabilities of these tags and the importance of using them correctly.
RFID TAG MAKER currently offers three options to allow our customers to use authentication tags.
We can use NXP’s popular NTAG424, NTAG223, and NTAG224, which allow our customers to encode and develop their own solutions. We typically stock a small number of tags in standard formats such as our NTAG424 wet inlays, NTAG424 white tags and NTAG424 PVC cards. However, we can offer NFC tags in a variety of formats, including customized products with different specifications and printing.
Although these NFC tags are very powerful and complex to encode/verify, they are actually very easy to use.
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6 How to buy NFC tags ?

If you are not familiar with NFC technology, then you will be confused about what NFC tag you should buy for your project. RFID TAG MAKER has a lot of experience and can help you start your project. We have also put together some useful information about buying NFC tags to help you out.

 

6.1 NFC TAG memory

First you need to choose the right NFC IC, because different NFC ICs, have different memory, more memory will not give you better performance. This is determined by what you are encoding.
So now that you know how much memory you may need, figuring out which chip you need is simply a matter of choosing one with enough available memory to store your data. Typically, our preferred options are the NTAG210micro or NTAG213. Because of the good performance of the ntag213 NFC tag, good availability and good price point.

 

6.2 How many NFC tags memory do I need?

Inside each NFC tag there is an NFC chip that holds your data and manages the communication with the NFC reader. Your data is stored in a small amount of non-volatile memory inside the NFC chip. Non-volatile memory is memory that retains stored information in the event of a power failure. The data in an NFC tag is usually measured in units called bytes, each of which is approximately equivalent to one text character.
In the NFC tag, there will also be memory for the chip itself and other functions. For example, each NFC tag has a unique ID (usually 14 characters long), which takes up memory space. You cannot change this memory, and in some cases, you may not be able to access it.
Therefore, there is a difference between the total amount of memory on the NFC tag and the actual amount of data you can store. Seritag defines the available memory as the memory space that can be encoded.
When writing standard NDEF messages (e.g. web links) to an NFC tag, there are always extra bytes of hidden information that tell your phone what type of data you are storing. While this is usually only about 5 bytes, it means that your available memory is further reduced.
For example, for the NTAG210µ chip, the total memory is 64 bytes. Of this, the “free memory” (the part you can put data in) is 48 bytes. To store URLs, you also need to store 8 bytes of “hidden” data, so you have 40 bytes for the actual URLs. In most cases, this is certainly enough, but you should always be aware of the difference between total memory and available memory.

 

 

6.3 NFC TAG quality

NFC tag quality is related to many factors, such as: surface material, antenna, chip and frequency.
NFC TAG and NFC TAG READER communicate at a specific frequency (13.56Mhz)
Just like a radio, small changes in “tuning” can lead to poor sound or distortion, changes in NFC TAG tuning can lead to degraded performance.
A good NFC TAG manufacturer will be able to better control this variation and, importantly, quality control the final output.
So, the rule here is to buy good quality NFC tags.

 

6.4 NFC tag price

The price of NFC TAGs is related to the number of orders and high volume production can reduce the price of NFC TAGr. Also the price of common chips will be lower than the price of special chips, generally ntag213nfc tag is the cheapest. ntag215,ntag216 price in increasing order.
The new ST25TN01K and ST25TN512 chips are also available. If you need to order, please contact us.

 

6.5 Genuine and counterfeit NFC TAG

Rule 1: Unless the cost of replacing an NFC tag is less than a few pence/cents and/or you don’t mind if some tags don’t work, buy a quality tag and a genuine chip.
The vast majority of NFC chips in NFC tags sold through retailers and large tag manufacturers today are manufactured by NXP Semiconductors. However, there are many non-genuine NXP chips, especially the MIFARE Ultralight.
RFID TAG MAKER only sells genuine NXP or other brand chips and has a tightly controlled supply chain. While you can choose not to purchase tags from RFID TAG MAKER, we strongly recommend that you use genuine chips and make sure you know your supplier and where they make the tags. The reliability and quality of non-genuine chips are not very good. Repeated UIDs, close scanning distances or not working at all, or application failures are common for counterfeit chips. Once your project with this poor quality NFC tag can cause huge damage.

 

7. Which phones support NFC?

Currently, almost all mobile smartphones can read NFC tags, and almost all Android phones can read and encode them. Apple has enabled NFC tag scanning through an app on iPhone 7, 8, and X running iOS 11 or later. The latest iPhone XS/XR, 11, 12, 13, and iPhone 14 models can scan NFC tags natively without an additional app. Android phones can read NFC tags without an app.

 

 

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8 How to encode NFC tags

By far the easiest way is to use an NFC-enabled phone. Almost all NFC-enabled Android phones can encode NFC tags, and iPhone 7 and higher running the latest iOS13 operating system can now encode them as well. There are many apps available to do this, but we usually recommend NFC Tools or NXP’s Tag Writer. Encoding is as simple as opening the app, entering your URL and placing your phone on the tag. If you are buying a lot of tags and don’t want to encode them yourself, RFID TAG MAKER can encode NFC tags for you when you order.
Storing information
Adding data to an NFC tag is called encoding. You can encode multiple data types onto an NFC tag. For example, you can choose to encode a URL (web address), a phone number, or a simple ID number. Data is usually stored in a specific way called NDEF (NFC Data Exchange Format) encoding. This common way of storing NFC information means that almost any NFC-enabled device will be able to read and understand the data and what type of data it is.

 

 

8.1 How many information can be stored on an NFC tag?

First we need to understand bytes, which are made up of eight “bits”. A bit is a binary “switch” – a 1 or a 0 (think yes or no). Thus, a byte contains eight 1s or 0s, for example 10110101. However, each bit in the byte has an increasing value, for example, the number 123 can be broken down into one hundred, twenty and three. Thus, “10” actually “values” 2, while “100” values 4. Ultimately, this means that the full “11111111 “value of 255, providing a total combination of 256 numbers (including 0).
For NFC tags, this number range is associated with a standardized set of letters and characters. Thus, the number 114 is associated with the letter “r”, 115 with the letter “s”, and so on.
The actual amount of data varies depending on the type of NFC chip used. Different tags have different chips, and each chip has a specific memory capacity. It is worth noting that NFC tags have a small memory capacity compared to other storage devices you may be familiar with, such as USB memory sticks or SD cards. In fact, most NFC tags can only store about one sentence of text. A typical NTAG210 NFC chip can only store URLs up to 40 characters long. The popular NTAG213 chip NFC tag can store URLs of up to about 130 characters.
But that’s all you need. NFC tags are usually considered references to data, not data storage itself. For example, you would not store a website on an NFC tag. You would store a URL/Web address that links the tag to the full Web site on the Internet. Similarly, you can store an ID on the tag so that you can tag the asset. This ID will allow you to identify the object and get more information from the “cloud” or other Internet sources. You do not have to store any asset information directly on the tag.

 

8.2 Can someone change the data on my NFC tag?

First we need to understand bytes, which are made up of eight “bits”. A bit is a binary “switch” – a 1 or a 0 (think yes or no). Thus, a byte contains eight 1s or 0s, for example 10110101. However, each bit in the byte has an increasing value, for example, the number 123 can be broken down into one hundred, twenty and three. Thus, “10” actually “values” 2, while “100” values 4. Ultimately, this means that the full “11111111 “value of 255, providing a total combination of 256 numbers (including 0).
For NFC tags, this number range is associated with a standardized set of letters and characters. Thus, the number 114 is associated with the letter “r”, 115 with the letter “s”, and so on.
The actual amount of data varies depending on the type of NFC chip used. Different tags have different chips, and each chip has a specific memory capacity. It is worth noting that NFC tags have a small memory capacity compared to other storage devices you may be familiar with, such as USB memory sticks or SD cards. In fact, most NFC tags can only store about one sentence of text. A typical NTAG210 NFC chip can only store URLs up to 40 characters long. The popular NTAG213 chip NFC tag can store URLs of up to about 130 characters.
But that’s all you need. NFC tags are usually considered references to data, not data storage itself. For example, you would not store a website on an NFC tag. You would store a URL/Web address that links the tag to the full Web site on the Internet. Similarly, you can store an ID on the tag so that you can tag the asset. This ID will allow you to identify the object and get more information from the “cloud” or other Internet sources. You do not have to store any asset information directly on the tag.

 

8.3 Can someone change the data on my NFC tag?

NFC tags can be locked so that once the data is written, it cannot be changed. For most tags, this is a one-way process, so once the tag is locked, it cannot be unlocked. Encoding and locking are two separate operations. NFC tags can be re-encoded multiple times until they are locked.
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9 NFC TAG Applications

Generally, you can divide the applications of NFC TAG into several areas – product status and maintenance
contactless payments
Asset management, marketing, information access and personal use.

9.1 Personal use

For personal use NFC TAGs can be used to control your phone. For example, use the NFC tag to turn on an alarm clock, connect to your wifi or something similar as below:
• Display a Business Card
• Open a link/URL
• Turn on/off Wi-Fi
• Turn on/off Bluetooth
• Open a preformatted Email
• Save or open a Telephone Number
• Open your Geo Location
• Launch an application
• Display Plain Text
• Open a preformatted SMS

9.2 Marketing

NFC tags provide a way to connect physical objects to the virtual online world. For marketing, it allows brands to provide their users with a quick way to learn more about their products and increase brand engagement.
For example, an NFC tag can be embedded in or attached to a product so that users can scan the NFC tag with their NFC-enabled phone to learn about the product or the manual. Or, an NFC tag can be embedded into a restaurant’s table decorations/stickers to allow access to the latest menu information or daily specials.

9.3 Asset Management

Asset management is a broad area that covers many use cases. This is probably the largest area of use for NFC TAGs today, from healthcare (people are assets!) to anti-counterfeiting systems, NFC tags are everywhere.

 

 

9.4 Contactless Payments

Contactless payments are the most prominent use case for NFC technology, and NFC makes transactions simple, secure and fast – a feature coveted by consumers and businesses alike.
NFC-enabled devices are driving the contactless payment revolution, especially after COVID.
Consumers don’t need to enter anything extra (PIN or signature) for small transactions. In addition, NFC is a more secure way to pay – transactions happen instantly and users don’t have to hand over their cards with sensitive information.
Google Pay is a prominent example of an NFC-based contactless payment solution. The application provides contactless payments to millions of consumers worldwide through their smartphones.
Public transportation. This is arguably a subset of mobile payments, but it’s worth mentioning in its own right. In fact, it may be a major driver of NFC adoption in urban areas with high population density and easy access to public transportation. Pilots and commercial programs have been deployed in many cities around the world where you can pay for buses, subways or trams with a tap of your phone.
You can also use NFC tags for ticket offices, NFC wristbands and NFC tickets for any type of ticket: concerts or live shows, conferences, sporting events, theme parks, check-in and boarding.

 

 

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9.5 Product status and maintenance

Semiconductor manufacturer NXP announces a new family of NFC integrated circuits. These circuits offer tamper detection and status monitoring capabilities, opening the door to a host of new use cases for NFC tags.
For example, NFC circuits can be included in a tamper-proof system to detect tampering events on sealed products. When the lid is tampered with, the tag sends a signal to the chip’s memory to record the seal’s breakage. Customers can later scan the product via smartphone to view the information.
Another NXP-manufactured circuit has a condition monitoring feature that detects moisture or fill levels in bottles and containers. To see the fill level of a product, you simply scan the NFC tag with your phone.

10 What else can I do with an NFC tag?

Semiconductor manufacturer NXP announces a new family of NFC integrated circuits. These circuits offer tamper detection and status monitoring capabilities, opening the door to a host of new use cases for NFC tags.
For example, NFC circuits can be included in a tamper-proof system to detect tampering events on sealed products. When the lid is tampered with, the tag sends a signal to the chip’s memory to record the seal’s breakage. Customers can later scan the product via smartphone to view the information.
Another NXP-manufactured circuit has a condition monitoring feature that detects moisture or fill levels in bottles and containers. To see the fill level of a product, you simply scan the NFC tag with your phone.

10.1 Authentication and Identification

For the sake of clarity, let’s define the difference between identification and authentication. We will use an NFC tag attached to a handbag as an example.
Identification is the ability of a tag to identify a specific model of handbag. It may provide information about the supply chain, the store that sold it, and possibly even the previous owner. It may provide specific information about that exact handbag. However, there is no guarantee that the tag and the handbag are authentic or what the user believes to be authentic.
Identification tags take an extra step. Not only do they allow the user to identify the handbag, but they also provide a very high level of security that the tag (and the bag to which the tag is attached) is actually the item it claims to be.
However, authentication is not just about preventing counterfeit products; it can also be used for access control, user authentication, connecting to NFT and virtual worlds, ticketing, gaming, document authenticity, and more.
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